China-HongKong3-feat

Restless Animals

8,008 km so far.

After all the climbing, hiking, and walking down memory lane, we were famished. Our post-tram hike took us straight to Pure Veggie House where we got vegetarian dim sum. We’ve only had dim sum a few times in our lives, so I didn’t really know what to order, but we ended up with an interesting and tasty selection of dumplings and other small bites.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The strangest were the slimy pink rolls of rice paper filled with veggies.

Red rice dumplings at Pure Veggie House, Hong Kong.

Red rice dumplings at Pure Veggie House, Hong Kong.

The most surprising was the congee (which we are sure we didn’t order) which came with salty fried donut-like bread and was quite delicious.

To Zoo Or Not To Zoo?

On our way home, we decided to walk through a little park we saw on the map. It turned out to be the Hong Kong Zoological And Botanical Gardens. Normally, we hate zoos, and would never pay to go into one. This one was free though, and we were inside before we knew what was happening. As soon as we got a look into some of the cages, we couldn’t look away.

There were giant cranes the size of ostriches and a flock of bright pink flamingoes. There was a cage of bright red Ibises that we mistook for flowers at first, since such vibrant birds fall far outside the realm of our imaginations.

Scarlet Ibises at Hong Kong Zoological And Botanical Gardens.

Scarlet Ibises at Hong Kong Zoological And Botanical Gardens.

Then there were the primates: gibbons, lemurs, tamarins, monkeys, macaques, and marmosets!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

There were even a couple of orang-utans, which were impossibly giant, and terribly sad-looking.

Bornean Orang-utan, Hong Kong Zoological And Botanical Gardens.

Bornean Orang-utan, Hong Kong Zoological And Botanical Gardens.

They only came out for a minute, until too many people gathered around their cages, and then they slunk back inside their shelters for a little privacy.

Our favourites were the jet-black Siamang, who flung themselves from corner to corner and top to bottom of their cages with such abandon that we wished we could join them.

Hilariously, amongst all this exoticism, there was a cage of racoons, which to Canadians are pretty much equivalent to rats (if slightly cuter).

The most worrying inhabitant of the zoo was the Burmese Python, which was just as terrifying as you might imagine. The list of its common habitats read like our upcoming itinerary: Southern China, Vietnam, Burma, Indonesia. It was almost enough to send me scurrying back to Scandinavia, where the worst they have is a few rats, and maybe a wolf or two.

The botanical part of Hong Kong Zoological And Botanical Gardens.

The botanical part of Hong Kong Zoological And Botanical Gardens.

Seeing all these animals caged up far from their homes tears me up inside. My scientific mind finds them beautiful and fascinating, and loves to get to see them up close. But my emotional side, my moral side, tells me it is just plain wrong to capture and keep sentient beings purely for our own edu-tainment.

Moving Day

After hours of walking and climbing, we finally arrived back at Teresa’s flat. But there was no rest for us today because it’s moving day. For the remainder of our Hong Kong days we’ll be soaking up the hospitality of fellow yoga teacher Nora. She and her husband Jason kindly offered us their flat while they travel for the holidays.

This, of course, is an incredibly kind and generous thing for them to do, especially since they’d never met us until we arrived in Hong Kong. We promise to take good care of the place and keep the plants alive until you two get back!  

Did you like this post? Please share it!

Facebook Twitter Email

Leave a comment

1 Comment

  1. […] can find out all about it in today’s bonus post which comes […]