The Day That Ends In A Treehouse

By Jane Mountain | April 22, 2014

13,159 km so far.

Our plan for today and the next few days is simple.

Let’s rest.

We have found that it’s been beneficial to take an extended break every couple of months to recharge and regenerate our enthusiasm for cycling. We’ve done pretty well so far, with two weeks off in Poland, a month in Berlin, a month in Shanghai, and almost two weeks in Hong Kong.

We’re overdue for another one though, and the beaches of Cambodia seem like a perfect place to kick back, chill out, and catch up on the blog.

There will also be plenty of goofing off involved.

Tired Tires

When we were planning this trip, there are certain things we didn’t account for. One was that we would go so far that we’d wear out our super hardcore Marathon Mondial tires. But, after almost 15,000 km, it seems we have done just that. Both of us are developing holes and cracks in our tires, which leads to extra flats.

Yesterday, Stephen discovered a flat on his front tire when we were on our way into town for breakfast. At dinner time, it was my turn. Then this morning, I discovered that my front tire was flat again. It’s quite possible that some of our tubes are losing their desire to remain impermeable too.

Gratuitous brownie shot, Epic Arts Cafe, Kampot.

Gratuitous brownie shot, Epic Arts Cafe, Kampot.

The result is that we are now in serious need of new tires, with little prospect of finding suitable ones before we get to Bangkok, which is a good 1,000 km away. Oops.

Top Of The Tree

Tonight, we’ll spend the night in an honest-to-goodness treehouse.

Tonight's bed is inside this treehouse, Samon Village, Kampot.

Tonight’s bed is inside this treehouse, Samon Village, Kampot.

A steep staircase-cum-ladder leads up and up into the tree, finally arriving at a doorway of woven bamboo.

Well, I can check sleeping in a treehouse off of my bucket list, Samon Village, Kampot.

Well, I can check sleeping in a treehouse off of my bucket list, Samon Village, Kampot.

Inside, there is a thin mattress, a mosquito net, and one open wall, hanging out over the river.

Mosquito net in the treehouse, Samon Village, Cambodia.

Mosquito net in the treehouse, Samon Village, Cambodia.

When the wind blows, the whole tree bobs and weaves, its ancient limbs creaking in protest.

Great view from up here, Samon Village, Kampot.

Great view from up here, Samon Village, Kampot.

As soon as we moved in, worker ants marched a highway into our food pannier, looking for buried treasure. So many tiny ants are swarming everywhere that we think the entire tree must be a labyrinth of trails and holes.

Somewhere deep inside the trunk, the queen and her leadership team are plotting their next move, not realising that every new tunnel they build weakens the structure of their home just a little bit more.

The treehouse looks like it’s been up here for a while, but still, we’re hoping the ants hold off on any new construction jobs until after we check out.  

Hi, I’m Jane, founder and chief blogger on My Five Acres. I’ve lived in six countries and have camped, biked, trekked, kayaked, and explored in 50! At My Five Acres, our mission is to inspire you to live your most adventurous life and help you to travel more and more mindfully.

2 comments

  1. Comment by Kimberly

    Kimberly Reply May 5, 2014 at 4:45 pm

    What fun the treehouse, but the ants really creep me out. When we head to the great northern reaches of Canada and spend weeks in rustic cabins on Nipissing, the ants rule the roost and I just can’t trust them enough to close my eyes and sleep well – I’m always on guard for those little buggers.

    • Comment by Jane

      Jane May 5, 2014 at 5:27 pm

      Ants are not my favourite either Kimberly. I’ve often commented that I love all creatures great and small, except ants. We got very used to them living in LA, as there were a couple of times each year when they would just invade our house. The only way to get rid of them was to wait. I didn’t mind them in a treehouse, but still, I was glad to leave.

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